Cape Town – Simonstown and Fish Hoek

We awoke to find the temperature had dropped overnight and that a fine mist had settled . Cape Town has a Mediterranean climate.  It rains in winter and the summers are dry, warm and sunny.   The weather is influenced by the cold Benguella current in the Atlantic Ocean.  This current brings plankton and thus fish, to its west coast.  The warmer Indian Ocean washes its southern coast.

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This is a photo of Table Mountain, taken from the V&A Waterfront.  The famous landmark was completely covered by mist.

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We enjoyed breakfast at one of the many venues at the Waterfront.

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The seagulls were resting, waiting for scraps of fish from the many fishing boats that continually move in and out of the harbour.

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After breakfast we travelled by car to Hout Bay, where we started our trip around the beautiful Chapman ‘s Peak Drive.  This spectacular drive takes one from Hout Bay,  around the Peninsula to Noordhoek.

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We stopped to take some photos of Hout Bay.  To the left of the photo is the famous surfing spot known as The Dungeons. The surf here is very dangerous as the waves are very large. 

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The tops of the mountain were still shrouded in mist.

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We were impressed with the engineering required to build this famous drive along the coast.

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This drive is as beautiful as the one along the Amalphi coast in Italy.

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We arrived at the historic naval base of Simonstown.

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Today Simonstown town is well known amongst tourists for its penguin colony at Boulders Beach.

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On our way to Boulders Beach we stopped to enjoy the view of False Bay.

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After going along the raised boardwalk, we reached Boulders Beach, which is famous for its colony of African penguins.

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One can swim or sunbathe with the penguins. 

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We left the penguins and drove to the fishing village of Fish Hoek.  There we had lunch at a small restaurant on the beachfront .  We enjoyed yellowtail which was freshly caught that day.

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After lunch we strolled along Fish Hoek beach to where the local fishermen were pulling in their catch.  This traditional fishing method is called ‘trek’ fishing.  ‘Trek’ is Dutch for pull and refers to the way that the fishermen pull in the nets.

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The fishermen were getting ready to take the nets out into the bay. 

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None of the boats have motors.  The fishermen row out with the heavy nets and lay them down in a big loop.

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In the 19th century Fish Hoek used to be one of the many places in the Cape  where whales were hunted for their blubber.  Fortunately this practice was banned.  In winter whales can be seen in this bay.

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The nets are then very slowly and gently pulled to shore.   The fishermen told us that they had caught about two to three hundred yellowtail that day.   They sometimes catch ‘harder’,  another popular eating fish.

We left the fishermen tidying their nets and travelled back to the Mother City of Cape Town.

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Author: valvs

I live in Umhlanga, Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa. Much of my schooling was done in the Eastern and Western Cape. After I matriculated from Rhenish Girls' High in Stellenbosch, I went to Grahamstown Teachers' Training College. Most of my teaching was done in Margate and Durban. My hobbies are reading, traveling and photography.

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